Abridged Version 2018 Ofsted Report for RISE

 

Effectiveness of leadership and management

Effectiveness of leadership and management

  • Leaders monitor the quality of teaching both formally and informally. Expectations are  reviewed regularly with individuals. This ongoing communication helps the deputy headteacher  advise the headteacher  on changes that are required to meet the needs of both pupils and staff.
  • Pupils’ s piritual, moral, social and cultural development is promoted well and is a key strength in the work of the school.
  • The school’s mentoring sessions help pupils over time to better understand themselves, their progress in learning and their ambitions for the future. These sessions also play a central role in helping pupils to reflect and learn from their mistakes and successes.  Pupils told the inspect or that this was a key reason they felt better prepared for their next stage  of education, training or employment.
  • The school adapts its curriculum to meet the needs of pupils at the school at any one time. Consequently, nearly all pupils, regardless of their background, including those learning English as an additional language, are prepared well to reintegrate into mainstream education.
  • Leaders go beyond national minimum expectations for reporting to parentsand carers. Parents and referring schools receive a termly report on a pupil’s academic and pastoral progress. Regular reporting is also seen as a strength from the commissioning local authorities. Those spoken to during the inspection report that this is a key strength
  • ‘They feedback on pupils’ progress and difficulties regularly and are proactive in acting on challenge or suggestions from us.  Equally, they recognise when we can provide help and additional resources to help  pupils.

 

Governance

  • The proprietor has managed staff changes well. Recruitment has been focused carefully on finding the right staff to work with the school pupils. Staff training and peer mentoring have helped to ensure that, despite staff turnover, the school continues to be good and improving.
  • The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.
  • Senior leaders have ensured that staff not only understand but also rigorously implement the safeguarding policy. Staff understand deeply the issues relating to the most common safeguarding issues affecting the school’s communities, for examplegangs, knife crime and county lines. Consequently, leaders have created  a culture of vigilance. Staff know and recognise the signs of abuse and neglect. They are quick to identify issues and tenaciously work with other agencies to ensure that early help is in place to support pupils and families.

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment

  • Teachers are ambitious for their pupils. Many pupils arrive late in the academic year. However, teachers’ good subject knowledge and careful assessment help pupils to overcome historical gaps in their learning. Consequently, pupils begin to catch up in their learning and acquire new knowledge across their curriculum.
  • Support staff are actively engaged to support pupils’ learning and know pupils well. Good communication between teachers and support staff helps them together to develop pupils’ learning. Together they keep pupils focused on learning and intervene quickly when individuals risk disrupting learning.

Personal development, behaviour and welfare

Personal development, behaviour and welfare

  • Staff know their pupils well. When new pupils join the school, they quickly build a positive relationship based on mutual respect and trust. Staff develop a clear understanding of pupils’ needs and their historical educational experiences, including the issues that have led to their placement in the school. Pupils say that they feel safe and that staff motivate them to strive to attain their aspirations.

Behaviour

  • The behaviour of pupils is good. Pupils’ behaviour improves significantly during their time at the school. Instances of serious misbehaviour and exclusions are not uncommon when arriving first into the school. However, staff take time to get to know pupils as individuals. Trusting relationships are developed over time. This is a key strength in the school’s work, given many pupils have had disrupted education historically. Consequently, repeat exclusions are rare as staff work to refine their interventions and mentoring with individuals.
  • Pupils say that they enjoy school. Typically, they begin their time having had large periods of absence from their education. Staff work well with referring schools and local authorities to overcome historical barriers to pupils’ attendance. Pupils begin to link their education with achieving their goals for future education, training or employment. Consequently, pupils’ attendance typically improves the longer pupils attend the school.

Outcomes for pupils

Outcomes for pupils

  • Daily checks and careful tracking over time enable leaders to ensure that pupils’ attendance and behaviour are improving. Communication between the deputy headteacher, teachers and support staff helps all focus on the individual needs of pupils. This results in the good improvements that pupils make to their attendance, punctuality and academic outcomes.
  • The support for those pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities is planned well and helps meet their individual needs. Learning is tailored to these needs and ensures that pupils make good progress across all areas of learning.
  • Careful planning that involves all key staff helps to ensure that pupils successfully transition back to mainstream schooling. Good communication with mainstream schools and further education colleges helps to ensure that pupils’ needs are communicated clearly to new providers of education or training.